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  #11  
Old 17-02-2013, 04:04 PM
maxc maxc is offline
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Default Re: NACA study 531

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Originally Posted by Richard L View Post
Had time to glance through the document today. It is an interesting read indeed.

I can imagine how this can be translated into the internal combustion engine dynamics.

Experiment shown present of water vapor aided frame front propagation of CO+O2 to CO2 conversion. During a normal combustion cycle starting from the onset of spark, the production of water vapor is continuous from the product of air and fuel. I can see a distinct advantage if there are presence of excess oxygen. In a fuel rich condition in a oxygen limited closed chamber, most of the CO just exits the engine via the exhaust pipe.

This is just a brief conclusion from reading the article briefly. Please chime in if you view it differently.
I view it the same way.

Fragmented combustion in a ICE is the reason why there is CO, HC,02,NOX left after combustion. I built a fragmented to Supersonic Injector for high speed combustion. Ran a big V8 engine for 20 minutes with it in garage with door shut. Any CO I'd be dead right now. Don't try this at home!!
Over on engine tips forum they say 0% humidity is when you get most power. Can't find info on that. Do you have info on that?

Last edited by maxc; 19-02-2013 at 03:24 PM. Reason: wrong terms
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  #12  
Old 17-02-2013, 04:21 PM
Richard L Richard L is offline
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Default Re: NACA study 531

I only just looking into this after reading your link.

Now I have to further research to get into greater details on this to form some some basic insight of this concept.

Basically deflagration has to be induced rather a natural combustion process. In your case, steam is used to initiate this?
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  #13  
Old 17-02-2013, 04:26 PM
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Default Re: NACA study 531

ICE? Please explain
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  #14  
Old 17-02-2013, 05:06 PM
maxc maxc is offline
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Default Re: NACA study 531

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Originally Posted by Richard L View Post
I only just looking into this after reading your link.

Now I have to further research to get into greater details on this to form some some basic insight of this concept.

Basically deflagration has to be induced rather a natural combustion process. In your case, steam is used to initiate this?
Your right I'm getting old used wrong terminology in previse post. Flagration too Deflagration sounds better?
I don't use steam in my pre-burn fuel system. Some steam is created in the fuel heating process.

Last edited by maxc; 18-02-2013 at 02:29 PM. Reason: grammer
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  #15  
Old 19-02-2013, 03:21 PM
maxc maxc is offline
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Default Re: NACA study 531

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ICE? Please explain
internal combustion engine
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  #16  
Old 19-02-2013, 11:04 PM
Richard L Richard L is offline
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Default Re: NACA study 531

I guess the NACA paper is focused on oxidantion of CO in a environment with steam.

Putting this study in practice in an ICE, CO percentage will be less but HC emissions is higher.
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  #17  
Old 21-02-2013, 03:28 PM
maxc maxc is offline
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Default Re: NACA study 531

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I guess the NACA paper is focused on oxidantion of CO in a environment with steam.

Putting this study in practice in an ICE, CO percentage will be less but HC emissions is higher.
All the air in the cylinder is at the same temperature on the tests they do.
Only the water vapor level is different. So water displaces 02 in test cylinder. But flame moves faster. Something too ponder?
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  #18  
Old 10-03-2013, 10:10 PM
maxc maxc is offline
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Default Re: NACA study 531

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Originally Posted by Richard L View Post
I guess the NACA paper is focused on oxidantion of CO in a environment with steam.

Putting this study in practice in an ICE, CO percentage will be less but HC emissions is higher.
One thing I've found with steam injection with carbed engine is that the HC's go down. I tested it with 4gas analyzer. Steam helps vaporize fuel on its way too combustion chamber. I don't have the 4gas analyzer now too show you that.
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  #19  
Old 10-03-2013, 10:28 PM
Richard L Richard L is offline
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Default Re: NACA study 531

I just wonder the amount of system introduced was only a fraction of the products of combustion, namely CO2 and H2O.

Have you tried to work out this ratio? I will be very interested.
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  #20  
Old 10-03-2013, 10:58 PM
maxc maxc is offline
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Default Re: NACA study 531

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I just wonder the amount of system introduced was only a fraction of the products of combustion, namely CO2 and H2O.

Have you tried to work out this ratio? I will be very interested.
It was a 2.3 liter pinto engine at idle the water flow rate was about 2cc per minute. Don't know what the steam temp was about 450f 500f?
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